Choreography
Cirque D'Amour

Cirque D'Amour
Photo by Sue Daniels

Cirque D'Amour

Cirque D'Amour
Photo by Sue Daniels

Cirque D'Amour

Cirque D'Amour
Photo by Catrine Turillon

Bella Luna

Bella Luna
Photo by Maddie Hayes

Bella Luna

Bella Luna
Photo by Sue Daniels

Flickers

Flickers
Photo by Sue Daniels

Bella Luna

Bella Luna
Photo by Sue Daniels

Ragtime

Ragtime
Photo by David Andrews

Peter Davison's choreography mixes contemporary ballet movement with physical theater, often incorporating an innovative use of objects inspired by his experience in vaudevillian and circus arts. He has created over 30 works for Boulder Ballet, where he was Co-Artistic Director for ten years, and his choreography has been presented by Ballet Nouveau Colorado, David Taylor Dance Theater, Saint Paul Ballet, and the Colorado Shakespeare Festival, among others. Peter is a recipient of the Ballet Builders Award for New Choreography, from New Choreographers on Pointe. NCOP presented excerpts from his ballet-with-objects Cirque D'Amour in New York City in 2009.

Choreographic overview: excerpts from Avenues of Influence, Bella Luna, Cirque D'Amour, Ragtime, and Rounds, to music by Jesse Manno.

Alex Davison performing Someone at the 2008 Youth America Grand Prix Ballet Competition.

Peter's 30-minute version of An American in Paris from 2007.


Choreography Reviews:
"My favourite on the programme was a pair of excerpts from Peter Davison's Cirque D'Amour...these two snippets were a pleasure. Davison himself dances in the first section with the excellent Jennifer Aiken and a chrome ladder, which is inventively manipulated – he steadies it, she climbs it, they both tilt and counterbalance it in uncanny ways, and they trade off managing the thing in the midst of some extraordinary partnering."
Tim Martin—Dance Europe Magazine

"So much the better for the lucky audience that got to experience Peter Davison's charming and heartbreaking work "Bella Luna," which premiered in 2014 and was presented at the O'Shaughnessy on Friday, hit all the right marks, weaving an enchanting tale with a sense of wonder. The work draws on commedia dell'arte characters, which the dancers embodied beautifully. Zoé Emilie Henrot's portrayal of Izzy deepened as the story progressed and she seemed to discover the joys and sorrows life has to offer. Her final solo, which was really a duet with the moon shining above her, brought the audience to tears."
Sheila Regan—Minneapolis Star Tribune

"Davison brings an imaginative, entertaining approach to this piece, justifying his receipt of the Ballet Builders Award from the New Choreographers on Pointe in New York City. Although the piece hangs together well, each of the seven sections has a surprisingly distinctive identity, with Davison making ample but not excessive use of props..."
Kyle MacMillan—The Denver Post

"My imagination was running wild throughout. When a performance is based on movement, music, facial expressions and the use of objects (pillows, a bike, umbrellas, red ribbons and more), your creative receptors kick in. The use of objects was simple yet rich with wonder. At one point, a man was pulling a red ribbon from a woman's chest – and their facial expressions and movements were so real – that I could feel the pain she was expressing. The music was powerful, the movement fit perfectly. (My muscles were tense throughout the whole show, by the way. I was expecting to be fighting off my infamous dosing-off-head-bob like I do every time I fly. Nope. Total opposite.)"
Brit Horvat—Your Hub

"A bit of fancy closed the evening. Peter Davison, utilizing his past as a circus and street performer, had his dancers fully and playfully explore various props, most inventively a two legged ladder on which a man and a woman climbed, suspended themselves, and toyed with weight, balance, and space... Like the best of the pieces presented, it fulfilled what it set out to do and then some."
R. Pikser—Theater Scene, New York

"Boulder Ballet's Comédia, created by Peter Davison, had all the elements of life and love when the Fine Arts Guild brought their production to Estes Park...A beautiful display of grace and athleticism filled the stage as dancers glided through a giant orb, and later communicated a work using only a ladder. Emotions such as joy, loss, failure and triumph played through each production. Comédia had the audience transfixed to the very end when the dancers ascended to take their bows."
Janice Mason—Estes Park Trail Gazette

"With innovative props such as a life size wooden door and rubber bike tires, Ragtime flowed from upbeat (Rolling Along) to border-line tear jerkers (Together). Davison"s ability to connect with the audience on such a roller coaster ride was effortless. The true-to-life portrayal each dancer brought to their character established an empathetic bond between those on stage and those in their seats. After all, watching the human experience never gets old."
Erica Prather—Denver Examiner